Legal news from Wednesday, May 10, 2006
21:05 EDT

[JURIST] The US Supreme Court [official website] ruled 5-4 Wednesday against issuing a stay of removal in the case of a British citizen with US permanent resident status who had been convicted of marijuana possession, domestic violence and resisting arrest in Mississippi. Kiren Kumar Bharti was granted permanent residency in [read more]

16:05 EDT

[JURIST] US Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL) [official website] said Wednesday that General Michael Hayden [official profile], the Bush administration's nominee for CIA director [JURIST report] replacing Porter Goss, has suggested that he might welcome a modification to the 1978 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) [text] bringing the Bush administration's domestic [read more]

15:05 EDT

[JURIST] Maurice Vellacott [official website], a Conservative Party member of the Canadian Parliament [official website, English version], resigned [statement, PDF] Wednesday from his position as chairman of the House of Commons Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Committee [official website] after making comments over the weekend about Canadian judges using their [read more]

15:05 EDT

[JURIST] British Attorney General Lord Goldsmith [official profile], already a critic [JURIST report] of the US detention facility at Guantanamo Bay [JURIST news archive], Wednesday made a forceful public call for the shutdown of the facility. Making a speech [text] in London's Whitehall, Goldsmith reminded his audience the British government [read more]

15:05 EDT

[JURIST] British doctors belonging to the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) and the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) [profession websites] have said they oppose [RCGP statement] a bill now before the UK House of Lords [official website] that would permit terminally ill patients to choose death by euthanasia. The [read more]

14:05 EDT

[JURIST] Judge J. Michael Luttig [SCOTUSblog backgrounder], 51, of the Richmond, Virginia-based US Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit [official website] resigned from the bench Wednesday to accept a position as senior vice-president and general counsel [Boeing press release] of the Boeing Company [corporate website], the giant airplane manufacturer [read more]

14:05 EDT

[JURIST] UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Louise Arbour [official profile; JURIST news archive] on Wednesday called the election by the UN General Assembly [JURIST report] of 47 member states to founding seats on the new UN Human Rights Council [official website; JURIST news archive] "very encouraging" and said [Reuters [read more]

13:05 EDT

[JURIST] A panel of the US District Court for the District of Columbia has rejected [opinion, PDF] a challenge brought by a nonprofit political interest group to the electioneering communication ban in the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 [FEC materials] that prohibits TV advertisements funded with corporate or union [read more]

13:05 EDT

[JURIST] The Australian and US governments will both have to approve the transfer of prisoners sentenced by US military commissions under the terms of a new agreement reached earlier this week, according to a statement from Australian Foreign Minister Alexander Downer. The agreement, reached Tuesday, may apply to David Hicks [read more]

13:05 EDT

[JURIST] The federal government is violating First Amendment free speech rights by withholding federal HIV/AIDS funding from human rights groups working abroad who refuse to sign a pledge condemning prostitution, according to an opinion [PDF text] released Tuesday by a New York federal judge. US District Court Judge Victor Marrero [read more]

12:05 EDT

[JURIST] The lawyer for Moustafa Hassan Nasr [Wikipedia profile], the Egyptian cleric who CIA operatives allegedly kidnapped and moved out of Italy [JURIST news archive] to Egypt in 2003 in an instance of extraordinary rendition [JURIST news archive], has claimed that Nasr was physically beaten while in US custody. Montasser [read more]

11:05 EDT

[JURIST] The US Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to vote Thursday on the controversial renomination of White House aide Brett Kavanaugh [White House backgrounder] to the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit. Kavanaugh faced probing questions from committee members Tuesday, one day after the American Bar Association [profession [read more]

10:05 EDT

[JURIST] The alleged assassin of Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic [BBC obituary; memorial website] has accused Serb police officers and other officials of forcing him to sign a statement that says he is responsible for the 2003 murder [JURIST report] of the Serbian reform leader outside a government building in [read more]

10:05 EDT

[JURIST] The US House of Representatives Tuesday approved a bill limiting protests during military funerals. The Respect for America's Fallen Heroes Act [text] is aimed mainly at the renegade Westboro Baptist Church [WARNING: readers may find material at this church website offensive; Wikipedia backgrounder] led by the Rev. Fred Phelps [read more]

09:05 EDT

[JURIST] Former US Attorney General Ramsey Clark [JURIST news archive], now serving as a defense lawyer for ousted Iraqi president Saddam Hussein [JURIST news archive], called the trial of the former Iraqi leader "a direct threat to international law, the United Nations, universal human rights and world peace" on Tuesday [read more]

09:05 EDT

[JURIST] Leading Wednesday's international brief, the High Court in London has recommended that the UK hacker behind unprecedented attacks on US military computer systems in late 2001 and early 2002 be extradited to the US to face criminal charges [US DOJ indictment]. Gary McKinnon [CNET interview; advocacy blog] is allegedly [read more]

08:05 EDT

[JURIST] US senators working towards a compromise on key sections of an immigration reform bill [JURIST news archive] they hope to vote on by Memorial Day have tentatively agreed to toughen rules on the hiring of illegal immigrants by forcing employers to check Social Security numbers and investigate the immigration [read more]

08:05 EDT

[JURIST] US District Judge Ricardo M. Urbina [official profile] has ruled that a lawsuit against US officials brought by four British citizens formerly held at Guantanamo who claim their religious freedoms were infringed during detention may go forward. Urbina found that because the Religious Freedom Restoration Act [text] applies to [read more]

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