Legal news from Tuesday, April 4, 2006
19:04 EDT

[JURIST] The US Central Intelligence Agency [official website] hid its rendition [JURIST news archive] of terrorism suspects to various foreign countries by using private air carriers and "front" companies, according to a new report [PDF text; AI summary] released by Amnesty International [advocacy website] late Tuesday. According to "Below the [read more]

19:04 EDT

[JURIST] A US military judge presiding over one of the military commission proceedings [US DOD backgrounder; JURIST news archive] that resumed [JURIST report] at Guantanamo Bay Tuesday appeared unsure of exactly what body of law would be applied in the case against Abdul Zahir [JURIST report], one of ten detainees [read more]

18:04 EDT

[JURIST] Senator John McCain (R-AZ) [official website] said in a press conference Tuesday that he likely does not have the 60 Senate votes required to overcome the expected procedural maneuverings of conservatives who oppose his bipartisan guest-worker plan, supported by the White House as part of an immigration reform package [read more]

18:04 EDT

[JURIST] During a US House Appropriations Committee hearing [announcement] Tuesday, Supreme Court Justices Clarence Thomas and Anthony Kennedy [official profiles] spoke against a bill [PDF text] that would permit public broadcasting of Supreme Court oral arguments. The justices told lawmakers that allowing cameras in the courtroom would alter the nature [read more]

16:04 EDT

[JURIST] Ugandan opposition leader Kizza Besigye [BBC profile; JURIST news archive] and 22 others pleaded not guilty to treason charges Tuesday at the opening of their trial in Kampala. The charges allege that the men plotted to forcefully overthrow the Ugandan government in operations in Kampala, in Rwanda, and in [read more]

15:04 EDT

[JURIST] King Gyanendra [official website; BBC profile] and the royal government of Nepal [JURIST news archive] on Tuesday banned all public meetings in the cities of Kathmandu and Lalitpur, a move the opposition has vowed to fight. The ban, which goes into effect Wednesday, is aimed at curbing anti-government protests, [read more]

14:04 EDT

[JURIST] French demonstrators staged a fifth day of protests Tuesday against the First Employment Contract (contrat premiere embauche, CPE) [JURIST news archive], a labor law [text, in French] that would create an age-based exception to traditional French labor regulations by allowing workers who were under 26 years of age at [read more]

13:04 EDT

[JURIST] US Rep. Tom DeLay (R-TX) [official website; JURIST news archive] said Tuesday that he is resigning [press release] from his seat in the US House of Representatives [official website] rather than enter a tough re-election race this fall. DeLay permanently stepped down from his post [JURIST report] as GOP [read more]

11:04 EDT

[JURIST] US District Judge Jeremy Fogel [official profile] has authorized lawyers to obtain information on executioners at San Quentin Prison, but has banned the release of any details about them to the public. Lawyers for convicted murderer and death row inmate Michael Morales [NCADP profile; JURIST news archive] are seeking [read more]

11:04 EDT

[JURIST] Former Liberian President Charles Taylor [BBC profile; JURIST news archive] met with several potential defense lawyers after he pleaded not guilty [JURIST report] Monday to 11 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity [amended indictment, PDF] at the UN-backed Special Court for Sierra Leone [official website]. Taylor and [read more]

10:04 EDT

[JURIST] British Defense Minister John Reid [official profile; BBC profile] on Tuesday called for changes to the international rules of war, including the Geneva Conventions [ICRC materials], in order to allow countries to better confront terrorism and other threats. In a speech [full text] before the Royal United Services Institute [read more]

10:04 EDT

[JURIST] Former Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori [personal website; JURIST news archive] will be extradited from Chile to Peru [JURIST news archives] to face corruption and human rights charges before this summer, Peru's Justice Minister Alejandro Tudela [official profile, in Spanish] said Tuesday. Tudela said the extradition would be completed before [read more]

10:04 EDT

[JURIST] UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan [official profile] on Tuesday called on states to ratify the 1997 anti-personnel mine ban treaty [text] and said that it should only take ten years to rid the world of all land mines will take ten years to complete, not 100 years as previously estimated. [read more]

10:04 EDT

[JURIST] The US military commissions [DOD backgrounder; JURIST news archive] at Guantanamo Bay are scheduled to resume proceedings Tuesday, with pre-trial hearings scheduled for four prisoners facing terrorism-related charges. Among those scheduled to appear is Binyam Muhammad [charge sheet, PDF], an Ethiopian man who has been charged with conspiring with [read more]

08:04 EDT

[JURIST] The US Supreme Court [official website] on Monday agreed to settle a split among the circuits on whether immigrants convicted of state drug felonies can remain in the US if their crimes were misdemeanors under federal law. The Court granted certiorari and consolidated appeals brought by two Mexican citizens. [read more]

08:04 EDT

[JURIST] A federal judge Monday denied a request by defense lawyers to review alleged National Security Agency (NSA) [official website] wiretaps in the government's case [complaint, PDF] against a Pakistani-American father and son who are accused of terrorism-related activities. Hamid Hayat was charged [PDF indictment] with lying to US law [read more]

07:04 EDT

[JURIST] The Iraqi High Criminal Court [official website; JURIST news archive] announced Tuesday that new genocide and crimes against humanity charges have been filed against Saddam Hussein [JURIST news archive] and six others in his former regime's crackdown against the Kurds during the 1980s. The new charges were filed with [read more]

07:04 EDT

[JURIST] US District Court Judge George Steeh [official profile] has struck down [opinion, PDF] a Michigan law [PDF text] prohibiting the sale of certain violent video games to minors, ruling that the law is unconstitutionally vague [ESA press release]. The law was signed by Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm [official website] [read more]

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