UK Lords reject effort to increase terror detention limit

[JURIST] An effort to increase the detention period for terror suspects in the UK from 28 days to 60 days was defeated Wednesday in the House of Lords [official website] by a vote of 210-108. Under current law [Criminal Justice Act 2003, amending the Terrorism Act 2000], terror suspects can be held without charge for 14 days, and a new anti-terror proposal [text] would increase the detention period to 28 days. UK Prime Minister Tony Blair had pressed for a 90-day detention, but members of the House of Commons in November voted against the proposal [JURIST report], marking Blair's first defeat in the Commons. Labour backbencher Lord Sewel led efforts to allow 60-day detentions, arguing that the longer period would allow police and intelligence agents to collect key evidence. BBC News has more.

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