Legal news from Tuesday, January 10, 2006
18:01 EDT

[JURIST] President Bush Tuesday signed into law a renewal of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 [PDF text; fact sheet], providing $361 million over two years towards to investigation and prosecution of human trafficking cases, most involving the sex trade. The US Justice Department reported [text, PDF] last year [read more]

18:01 EDT

[JURIST] One day before hearings resume [JURIST report] before military commissions at Guantanamo Bay [JURIST news archive] in the cases of two alleged terrorists, chief US prosecutor Col. Moe Davis Tuesday characterized defendant Omar Khadr [US DOD chargesheet, PDF; DOD press release; JURIST news archive], a Canadian citizen who was [read more]

17:01 EDT

[JURIST] Three ethnic Chechens charged with the murder [JURIST report] of US journalist Paul Klebnikov [Economist obituary] pleaded not guilty Tuesday during a closed hearing in a Moscow court on the first day of their trial. Observers expect an emotional and time-consuming proceeding unfolding in coming months - the Russian [read more]

17:01 EDT

[JURIST] The US Supreme Court [official website; JURIST news archive] heard oral arguments Tuesday in the consolidated cases Texaco v. Dagher and Shell Oil v. Dagher [Duke Law case backgrounder; merit briefs], where it will decide whether a lawful joint business venture between two or more companies violates the Sherman [read more]

15:01 EDT

[JURIST] Spain's National Court (Audiencia Nacional) [official backgrounder] said Tuesday it will investigate whether seven former Chinese leaders committed genocide and other crimes in Tibet. The genocide suit was filed last June by three Tibet support groups and thrown out in September. Since then, however, Spain's Constitutional Court [official website] [read more]

15:01 EDT

[JURIST] Ukraine Justice Minister Serhiy Holovatyi [official profile] on Tuesday warned that the country was plunging into "legal chaos" [RIA Novosti report] after the Ukrainian Parliament [official website] voted to fire Prime Minister Yuri Yekhanurov's government in a no-confidence motion [BBC report]. The parliament vote was in response to the [read more]

15:01 EDT

[JURIST] Leading Tuesday's environmental law news, the first Asia-Pacific Development and Climate Partnership Ministerial Meeting [backgrounder] has opened in Sydney, Australia. The meeting brings representatives from the US, Australia, Japan, China, South Korea and India together to set up projects to create emissions reduction technology and promote the transfer of [read more]

13:01 EDT

[JURIST] UK Home Secretary Charles Clarke [official profile] has rejected criticisms by UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Louise Arbour [official profile; JURIST news archive] that Britain's proposed anti-terrorism bill [text] violates basic rights and sets a "worrying precedent." Arbour sent a letter to the British government in November saying [read more]

13:01 EDT

[JURIST] Peru's National Election Council formally announced Tuesday that former president Alberto Fujimori [personal website; JURIST news archive] is banned from participating in the April 9 presidential election. The council's decision came after Fujimori registered as a presidential candidate [JURIST report], despite a Peruvian Constitutional Court [official website, in Spanish] [read more]

13:01 EDT

[JURIST] The lower chamber of Russia's parliament, the Russian State Duma [official website in Russian], approved a bill Tuesday mandating stricter controls on non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that could dissolve many of the present NGOs that openly criticize the government. The measure passed by a margin of 357-20 in the third [read more]

11:01 EDT

[JURIST] US Supreme Court nominee Judge Samuel Alito [official profile; JURIST news archive] on Tuesday told the Senate Judiciary Committee [official website] that he would keep an open mind on the issue of abortion and that the president was not above the law in times of war during the first [read more]

11:01 EDT

[JURIST] South Korean prosecutors said Tuesday that they will open a criminal investigation into South Korean scientist Hwang Woo-Suk [BBC profile], a day after an investigation concluded that Hwang's acclaimed research on stem cells was fake. Reports suggest that prosecutors could pursue charges of fraud and embezzlement after Hwang won [read more]

10:01 EDT

[JURIST] The US Supreme Court [official website] on Tuesday ruled that states have no immunity from private lawsuits under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) [text] if the state has violated the Fourteenth Amendment. In United States v. Georgia [Duke Law case backgrounder; JURIST report], 04-1203, the Court unanimously ruled [read more]

09:01 EDT

[JURIST] Two British officials charged with leaking a UK government memo in which President Bush reportedly suggested bombing the offices of Arab satellite news channel Aljazeera [media website] will stand trial by the end of the month, the judge in the trial ordered at a hearing Tuesday. Judge Timothy Workman [read more]

09:01 EDT

[JURIST] The European Court of Justice [official website] on Tuesday upheld a law [text] that requires airlines to pay compensation to passengers [JURIST report] who experience long flight delays, overbooking and cancellation on flights to and from the European Union. The International Air Transport Association [group website] and the European [read more]

09:01 EDT

[JURIST] US District Judge Sim Lake on Monday refused to dismiss the criminal case against former Enron founder Kenneth Lay [Chronicle profile] and former CEO Jeffrey Skilling Chronicle profile], saying that the defense had failed to prove that there was "deliberate, systematic prosecutorial misconduct" that has interfered with the defendants' [read more]

08:01 EDT

[JURIST] Judges who serve on the US Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) [FJC backgrounder] met with officials from the Department of Justice Monday for a closed-door briefing [JURIST report] on the president's decision to allow warrantless domestic eavesdropping [JURIST news archive]. While members of the court declined to comment on [read more]

08:01 EDT

[JURIST] Mehmet Ali Agca [Wikipedia profile], the man who shot Pope John Paul II [official website; JURIST news archive] in 1981, may face new charges in Turkey of draft dodging and escaping military custody after he is released from prison on Thursday [JURIST report], an official said Monday. Agca shot [read more]

08:01 EDT

[JURIST] General Sir Michael Rose [Wikipedia profile], a retired British military leader and the former UN military commander in Bosnia, has said that UK Prime Minister Tony Blair [official profile; JURIST news archive] should be impeached for making the decision to go to war in Iraq based on flawed claims [read more]

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