Peru protests Japan refusal to extradite Fujimori by pulling ambassador

[JURIST] Peru announced Thursday that it is removing its ambassador from Japan to protest Tokyo's refusal to extradite former Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori [Wikipedia profile; personal website]. Fujimori was detained earlier this week in Chile [JURIST report] on an international arrest warrant and Japanese diplomats visited with Fujimori [BBC report], promising to defend Fujimori's rights. Chilean officials have so far been receptive to Peru's extradition requests, but have indicated that a fair trial will be held to determine whether to extradite Fujimori. The former president ruled Peru from 1990-2000, after which time he fled to Japan amidst charges of corruption [JURIST report]. Fujimori is recognized as a citizen by Japan because his parents were Japanese, and the country has declined to extradite him to Peru since no extradition treaty exists between the two countries. Peru's Foreign Minister Oscar Maurtua [official profile in Spanish] said that Fujimori entered Chile using his Peruvian passport and that "Japan lacks authority to intervene in the extradition process that Peru is pursuing with Chilean authorities." A spokesman for the Japanese Foreign Ministry [official website] said the country has not been formally told about the ambassador's withdrawal. Meanwhile, Peruvian courts are preparing the case against Fujimori, who faces 21 charges of corruption and human rights abuses [IPS report], totaling up to 225 years in prison if he is convicted. Jose Luis Lecaros, a justice on Peru's Supreme Court, said the government has a strong case against Fujimori that they will present at his extradition trial in Chile. AP has more.



 

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