Legal news from Monday, November 14, 2005
20:11 EDT

[JURIST] French President Jacques Chirac [BBC profile] Monday delivered his first televised address [text, in French; translated excerpts] since a recent surge of violence began in France [JURIST news archive] nineteen days ago, promising that justice would be meted out to those responsible for the riots. "Those who make attacks [read more]

19:11 EDT

[JURIST] In a report [PDF text; summary] released Monday, the US Governmental Accountability Office (GAO) [official website] characterized the Federal Drug Administration's review of the birth control drug Plan B [product website; FDA backgrounder] for over-the-counter sale as "unusual" in procedure. The GAO report alleges that FDA management was more [read more]

18:11 EDT

[JURIST] European Commissioner for Justice and Home Affairs [official website] Franco Frattini [official profile] said Monday that although the informal EU investigation [JURIST report] into the alleged existence of secret US prisons [JURIST report] in European Union nations has revealed nothing, the EU will sanction any country found to house [read more]

16:11 EDT

[JURIST] Racial animus accounted for more than half of the 7,649 hate crimes reported in the United States in 2004, a 5 percent rise from 2003, according to the FBI's annual FBI Hate Crimes Statistics report [text; press release]. Overall, the nation experienced a slight two percent increase in hate [read more]

16:11 EDT

[JURIST] Lawyers in the US Department of Justice Civil Rights Division [official website] are leaving their positions in record numbers amid allegations that the current administration is damaging morale and frustrating the efforts of long-time employees, according to a Washington Post report. The report alleges that attorneys in the division, [read more]

15:11 EDT

[JURIST] A Federal Communications Commission [official website] order [PDF text], which sets the date for all broadband and internet-phone providers to modify their systems to comply with a federal law that requires telecommunications providers to cooperate with law enforcement agencies seeking to conduct wiretaps, took effect Monday. The order, adopted [read more]

15:11 EDT

[JURIST] Kizza Besigye [BBC profile], the president of the opposition Forum for Democratic Change (FDC) party, was arrested and charged with treason and rape in Uganda [JURIST news archive] Monday. Prosecutors allege that Besigye participated in acts of treason to overthrow the government with the radical rebel group People's Redemption [read more]

15:11 EDT

[JURIST] Lawyer Thamer Hamoud al-Khuzaie, who represents two of Saddam Hussein's co-defendants, has fled Iraq and is seeking asylum in Qatar following an attempt on his life. The news was revealed in a letter, obtained by Reuters Monday, written by Khuzaie to Qatar's Emir Sheik Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani [profile]. [read more]

14:11 EDT

[JURIST] A document [PDF text] released Monday by the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and the George H.W. Bush Presidential Library reveal that Supreme Court nominee Samuel Alito [White House profile; US News profile] wrote in 1985 that he was proud of helping the government argue that "the Constitution does not [read more]

14:11 EDT

[JURIST] At the close of a three-day meeting in Brussels Monday, the leaders of eight Bosnian political parties failed to reach an agreement on a new draft constitution [JURIST report] for the country. Representatives of the three main nationalities in Bosnia [government website; CIA backgrounder], Muslims, Serbs and Croats, agreed [read more]

12:11 EDT

[JURIST] The US Supreme Court [official website, JURIST news archive] ruled Monday that parents who challenge special education programs for not meeting their children's needs must bear the burden of proving the programs' inadequacies, and not school officials. The case, Schaffer v. Weast [Duke Law backgrounder], is a loss for [read more]

11:11 EDT

[JURIST] A court in Uzbekistan [BBC profile, JURIST news archive] has found 15 men guilty of terrorism, attempted overthrow of the government, hostage taking and murder. The defendants, who all pleaded guilty, were accused of leading an uprising [JURIST report] in the town of Andijan in May. The uprising was [read more]

10:11 EDT

[JURIST] Courts in Spain, Italy and Germany are considering inquiries into CIA operations in Europe, specifically its rendition program, where suspected terrorists are kidnapped and sent to countries that will torture them. The Spanish investigation began in March when a Majorcan newspaper reported that CIA planes were visiting the island's [read more]

10:11 EDT

[JURIST] New court documents have been released outlining potential arguments to be made during the penalty phase of proceedings against 9/11 suspect Zacarias Moussaoui [JURIST news archive]. According to the transcript of an October hearing recently unsealed, prosecutors will argue Moussaoui deserves the death penalty because he "lied to federal [read more]

10:11 EDT

[JURIST] Callixte Kalimanzira, Rwanda's interior minister during the 1994 genocide [BBC backgrounder], pleaded not guilty to three counts of genocide and crimes against humanity at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) on Monday. Kalimanzira surrendered [JURIST report] to the tribunal voluntarily on November 8. Prosecutors allege [ICTR press release] [read more]

10:11 EDT

[JURIST] US Attorney General Alberto Gonzales promised his Australian counterpart Philip Ruddock Monday that Australian terror suspect David Hicks [BBC profile; JURIST news archive] would receive a fair trial before a military commission [JURIST news archive], but refused to give a time frame for when the trial is likely to [read more]

09:11 EDT

[JURIST] Last week's ruling by the European Court of Human Rights [JURIST report; opinion text] upholding Turkey's ban on headscarves [JURIST news archive] in public universities, has led to confrontation between the Islamic government and the law's secular proponents. Turkish President Ahmet Necdet Sezer [official profile], who supports the ban, [read more]

09:11 EDT

[JURIST] US National Security Adviser Stephen Hadley [official profile] refused to rule out the possibility that torture would be used [interview transcript] to prevent a future terrorist attack, during an appearance Sunday on CNN's Late Edition, but maintained that the country will act within the confines of the law. The [read more]

08:11 EDT

[JURIST] The UN Assistance Mission in Iraq (UNAMI) [official website], in its second bi-monthly human rights report [text, DOC] covering the period from September 1 to October 31, on Monday warned of human rights violations in Iraq [press release, DOC] in light of the increased number of detainees held on [read more]

08:11 EDT

[JURIST] Two Bangladeshi judges were killed on Monday after a man threw a bomb at their car while the judges were on their way to the Jhalakathi district court, 155 miles south of Dhaka. Police said a young man has been arrested at the blast site where an unexploded bomb [read more]

07:11 EDT

[JURIST] The French Cabinet Monday approved an extension to emergency powers authorized earlier this month [JURIST report; press release, in French] in order to help quell riots [JURIST report] that started on October 27. Parliament is expected to approve the bill, deemed by French President Jacques Chirac [official profile] to [read more]

07:11 EDT

[JURIST] Both the number of people sentenced to death and the number executed declined in 2004, according to US Justice Department statistics [PDF report; DOJ press release] released Sunday. According to the report, in 2004 a dozen states executed 59 prisoners, six less than in 2003 and 125 people convicted [read more]

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