Libya court postpones ruling on medics accused of infecting children with HIV

[JURIST] The Libyan Supreme Court has postponed until November 15 a ruling on the death sentences of five Bulgarian nurses and a Palestinian doctor [backgrounder] who were convicted in May 2004 of purposely infecting 400 children with the virus that causes AIDS during an experiment to find a cure for the disease. The medical workers say they were tortured into confessing; they and supporting human rights groups argue that they were used as scapegoats by Libya to conceal unhygenic conditions in its hospitals. The postponement has been praised by EU External Relations Commissioner Benita Ferrero-Waldner [press statement], Bulgarian Foreign Minister Solomon Passy and other groups [statement by Physicians for Human Rights] who had expressed concern about the outcome of the trial. Wikipedia has a timeline of the trial and charges. South Africa's Mail & Guardian has more.

 

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