June 25, 2014
by William Hibbitts
The US Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that police officers must obtain a warrant before searching a person's cell phone data, even at the time of arrest. In Riley v. California and United States v. Wurie, the court considered the question of whether a search of cell phone data without a warrant ...[read more]
March 23, 2014
by Endia Vereen
JURIST Assistant Editor Brent Nesbitt, University of Pittsburgh School of Law Class of 2016, discusses the search incident to arrest exception to the Fourth Amendment in United States v. Wurie...On Tuesday, April 29, the US Supreme Court will hear argument in the case of United States v. Wurie ...[read more]
September 3, 2013
by Zachariah Rivenbark
The Federalist No. 67, written by Alexander Hamilton and published in March 1788, discussed the power of the executive to grant recess appointments under the US Constitution. According to Hamilton, the Framers of the US Constitution intended that the recess appointments clause at Article II, ...[read more]
June 4, 2012
by Rebecca DiLeonardo
The US Supreme Court granted certiorari Monday in Bailey v. United States to determine whether police officers may lawfully detain individuals incident to a search warrant when those individuals have left the premises before the search warrant could be executed. The defendant has argued that the ...[read more]
February 23, 2012
by Julia Zebley
The US Supreme Court ruled 6-3 Tuesday in Messerschmidt v. Millender that police officers continue to have qualified immunity if a search warrant is later found invalid. Chief Justice John Roberts, writing for the majority, noted that the bar set in United States v. Leon is a high standard, where ...[read more]
January 27, 2012
by Cody Harding
On January 27, 2011, the Arizona House of Representatives and Senate introduced bills challenging the right to US citizenship for the children of legal and illegal immigrants born in the state. By introducing revisions to Title 36, Chapter 3 of the Arizona Revised Statutes, the legislature sought ...[read more]
December 31, 2011
by Cody Harding
On December 31, 2004, Ricardo Palmera, also known as "Simon Trinidad," was extradited to the United States on charges of drug smuggling and kidnapping. Palmera was a senior leader of the Colombian rebel group the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Columbia (FARC). Colombian President Alvaro Uribe ...[read more]
August 28, 2011
by Aman Kakar
The United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit Friday ruled that there is a clearly-established First Amendment right to film police officers performing their duties in a public space. The case stems from a 2007 incident, when police officers arrested Simon Gilk after he openly recorded ...[read more]
June 16, 2011
by Julia Zebley
The US Supreme Court on Thursday ruled 7-2 in Davis v. United States that when the law for what constitutes a legal search changes between a search and an accompanying trial, the evidence is not excluded. Justice Samuel Alito's opinion states that because suppression of the evidence would do ...[read more]
May 26, 2011
by Zach Zagger
The US Supreme Court Thursday ruled in Fowler v. United States that under a federal witness tampering statute the government must show there was a reasonable likelihood the witness would communicate relevant information to federal officers. Charles Fowler was convicted of killing a local police ...[read more]

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