December 1, 2014
by Alexandra Farone
The UN Committee Against Torture released a report on Friday that found the US has fallen short of full compliance with the Convention Against Torture international treaty. Police brutality, detention facilities, military interrogations and the criminalization of torture itself were several of ...[read more]
November 21, 2014
by Christina Alam
JURIST Guest Columnist Fredrick Vars, of the University of Alabama School of Law, discusses the new Alabama Gun Control Law and argues that the state's gun regulations will be largely unaffected by the new constitutional amendment...Alabama voters, on November 4, overwhelmingly approved a state ...[read more]
November 4, 2014
by Taylor Brailey
The UN Committee Against Torture (UNCAT) on Monday opened its 53rd session and discussed the changes that have been made since the Convention Against Torture, an international legal framework to prevent torture and other types of inhumane treatment or punishment, was adopted 30 years ago. During ...[read more]
November 2, 2014
by Sarah Steers
Changing international relations at the end of the 20th century, as well as concern for how various countries would handle sensitive environmental issues, led to the UN Conference on Environment and Development, also known as the Rio Conference. Held in June 1992, the conference produced the first ...[read more]
August 31, 2014
by Sarah Steers
Cuban nationalists began pressing for independence from Spain in the mid-nineteenth century. Cuban guerrilla fighters initiated frequent skirmishes with the Spanish military between 1868 and 1878. Revolutionary activities picked up in the 1890s and Spain imposed martial law in 1896. International ...[read more]
August 31, 2014
by Michael Roberts
Cuba leased the southern portion of Guantanamo Bay to the US on February 23, 1903, as part of the Cuban-American Treaty that allowed the US military to construct a permanent naval base on the site. The base has been in regular use since its establishment, and is a source of consistent tension ...[read more]
June 2, 2014
by Jaclyn Belczyk
The US Supreme Court ruled Monday in Bond v. United States that prosecutors cannot use an international chemical weapons treaty to convict a woman who attacked her husband's lover. Carol Anne Bond attempted to poison the woman by applying two toxic chemicals to her mailbox, car door handles and ...[read more]
May 5, 2014
by Addison Morris
The Vatican appeared before the Geneva committee that oversees the UN Convention Against Torture on Monday, arguing that a strict interpretation of the convention limited the church's responsibility for the international priest sex abuse scandal. The universal governing structure of the Catholic ...[read more]
April 19, 2014
by Jason Kellam
JURIST Guest Columnist Mary Wareham of Human Rights Watch discusses the US use of landmines and the possibility of the US joining the Mine Ban Treaty... Since antipersonnel landmines were banned by a majority of nations 15 years ago via an international treaty, their use even by those outside the ...[read more]
April 16, 2014
by Benjamin Minegar
Bolivian President Evo Morales on Tuesday filed a lawsuit in the International Court of Justice laying claim to a 240-mile area in Chile that provides access to the Pacific Ocean. Bolivia reportedly lost its claim of ownership to the land during a war with Chile in the 1800s. Chile alleges a ...[read more]

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