May 6, 2015
by Emelina Perez
Afghanistan's Primary Court in Kabul sentenced four men to death on Tuesday for the mob killing of a 27-year-old Afghan woman in March. Farkhunda was killed March 19 after being accused of burning a copy of the Koran, although an investigation later determined she never did. The attack was ...[read more]
May 5, 2015
by Emelina Perez
The US Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit ruled Tuesday that police may obtain historical cell phone tower location information from third-party businesses without a search warrant. Quartavius Davis was convicted for committing seven separate armed robberies between August and October 2010 ...[read more]
February 2, 2015
by Brittany Felder
The head of the UN Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), Irina Bokova, on Monday condemned the killings of Mexican journalist Moisés Sánchez Cerezo and Japanese freelancer Kenji Goto. Moisés Sánchez Cerezo was the owner and editor of the weekly magazine, La Unión, which... ...[read more]
January 14, 2015
by Taylor Gillan
The US Supreme Court ruled Wednesday on the ability of localities to deny permission to build cell phone towers. The case of T-Mobile South, LLC v. City of Roswell concerned what it means to satisfy the "in writing" requirement of the Telecommunications Act. The court's holding provides that the ...[read more]
November 1, 2014
by Taylor Gillan
A judge for the 2nd Judicial District of Virginia on Thursday ruled that police can force criminal suspects to unlock their cell phones with a fingerprint scanner to allow officers to open and search them. Officers may not, however, compel suspects to give up their phone pass codes. Judge Steven ...[read more]
August 31, 2014
by Dominic Yobbi
The Zimbabwean government stated this week that it is in the process of developing new cyber laws to regulate social media. Caecilia Nyamutswa, legal director of the regulatory organization Potraz, communicated to an information and communication technology (ICT) committee that the bills are ...[read more]
August 6, 2014
by Jason Kellam
JURIST Columnist Adam Banner of the Oklahoma Legal Group discusses the Fourth Amendment implications of warrantless cell phone searches in the context of two recent Supreme Court decisions on the issue... Two cases recently decided by the US Supreme Court will likely have a tremendous impact on ...[read more]
July 26, 2014
by Kimberly Bennett
The US House of Representatives on Friday passed a bill that would make it legal for individuals to open the digital locks on their cellphones. The process, known as unlocking or jailbreaking, is currently illegal, punishable by fines of up to $500,000 and five years in jail for unlocking ...[read more]
June 30, 2014
by Alex Ferraro
JURIST Contributing Editor Marjorie Cohn of the Thomas Jefferson School of Law discusses some of the possible implications of the Supreme Court's recent decision on cell phone searches ... In one of the most significant Fourth Amendment rulings ever handed down by the Supreme Court, all nine ...[read more]
June 25, 2014
by William Hibbitts
The US Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that police officers must obtain a warrant before searching a person's cell phone data, even at the time of arrest. In Riley v. California and United States v. Wurie, the court considered the question of whether a search of cell phone data without a warrant ...[read more]

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