April 22, 2014
by Jaclyn Belczyk
The US Supreme Court ruled 6-2 Tuesday in Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action that the judiciary lacks the authority to overturn a Michigan voter initiative that amended the state's constitution to prohibit race- and sex-based discrimination or preferential treatment in public ...[read more]
November 10, 2013
by Michael Kalis
JURIST Guest Columnist Andy Grewal of the University of Iowa College of Law says that the oral arguments in US v. Woods suggest that the Supreme Court is more interested in a jurisdictional issue, and discusses an argument, which neither party addressed, that could be dispositive of the ...[read more]
October 19, 2013
by Alex Ferraro
JURIST Guest Columnist Benjamin Davis of the University of Toledo College of Law examines the recent oral arguments in Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action ...From reading the transcript of the oral argument in the Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, I was appalled at ...[read more]
October 15, 2013
by Jaclyn Belczyk
The US Supreme Court heard oral arguments in three cases Tuesday, including an affirmative action case and a case on suing foreign corporations in US courts. In Daimler AG v. Bauman the court heard arguments on "whether it violates due process for a court to exercise general personal jurisdiction ...[read more]
October 9, 2013
by Jaclyn Belczyk
The US Supreme Court heard oral arguments in two cases Wednesday. In United States v. Woods the court heard arguments on whether 26 USC 6662 of the Internal Revenue Code, which prescribes a penalty for an underpayment of federal income tax that is "attributable to" an overstatement of basis... ...[read more]
July 22, 2013
by Alexandra Cabonor
JURIST Guest Columnist George B. Washington of the Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, Integration & Immigrant Rights, and Fight for Equality By Any Means Necessary discusses the repercussions of Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action ...In the fall term of 2013, the US Supreme ...[read more]
July 21, 2013
by Andrew Morgan
On June 4, 1965, US President Lyndon B. Johnson delivered a commencement address at Howard University in Washington, DC, that applauded efforts by the federal government to address race discrimination. Despite these efforts, however, the president stressed that the job was far from being complete. ...[read more]
July 20, 2013
by Zachariah Rivenbark
Public understanding of the shape and direction of affirmative action has been influenced primarily by US Supreme Court decisions. However, affirmative action litigation decided in state courts and federal courts other than the Supreme Court has also had a lasting influence on its legality and ...[read more]
July 20, 2013
by Zachariah Rivenbark
The Supreme Court took up the issue of affirmative action in June 2003, when the high court decided the twin cases of Grutter v. Bollinger and Gratz v. Bollinger. Both cases involved the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. The separate cases produced separate results for the undergraduate school ...[read more]
July 20, 2013
by Zachariah Rivenbark
Affirmative action has an extensive legislative history with origins dating back to early debates concerning the application of the Fourteenth Amendment. The first governmental reference to affirmative action in the US was Executive Order 10925, issued by US President John F. Kennedy in March ...[read more]

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