April 26, 2015
by Taylor Gillan
Bahrain Public Prosecution on Sunday extended the period of detention of Bahraini human rights activist Nabeel Rajab by 15 days, citing a need for further investigation. According to Rajab's wife, the activist was arrested on April 2 for tweets he posted about torture practices in Jau prison. At ...[read more]
March 30, 2015
by Elizabeth Dennis
JURIST Guest Columnist David M. Crane of Syracuse University College of Law discusses enforcing the laws of armed conflict in an age of extremes... Shortly after three planes went into three buildings on September 11, 2001 the chief law enforcement officer of the US, Attorney General Albert ...[read more]
February 26, 2015
by Alison Sacriponte
A military judge on Wednesday halted proceedings in the 9/11 terrorism case due to a new Defense Department rule that forces judges to relocate to Guantanamo Bay. In December military commission judges were directed to move to Guantanamo at the request of a Pentagon legal official in hopes of ...[read more]
January 17, 2015
by Christopher Dellana
After September 11, 2001, the US government authorized a military offensive against Al-Qaeda, the group that claimed responsibility for the terrorist attacks. During this offensive, the US Central Intelligence Agency's (CIA) carried out what has been described as a "torture program" to obtain ...[read more]
September 24, 2014
by Taylor Gillan
A federal judge on Tuesday sentenced Suleiman Abu Ghaith, son-in-law of Osama bin Laden, to life in US prison for terrorism-related charges. Ghaith, the highest ranking al Qaeda figure to face trial in a US court since the September 11 terrorist attacks, was found guilty in March of conspiring to ...[read more]
September 16, 2014
by Josh Guckert
JURIST Guest Columnist Sandy Davidson, of the University of Missouri School of Journalism and School of Law, discusses the recent revelations of Yahoo and the potential fallout...At least the Yahoo case has now shed a little sunshine on secret government surveillance. The US government, as part ...[read more]
September 3, 2014
by William Helbling
The US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit on Tuesday heard oral arguments about the National Security Agency (NSA) practice of collecting millions of Americans' phone records. The three-judge panel criticized the spy program, which was revealed more than a year ago. The lawsuit was brought by ...[read more]
August 31, 2014
by Michael Roberts
Cuba leased the southern portion of Guantanamo Bay to the US on February 23, 1903, as part of the Cuban-American Treaty that allowed the US military to construct a permanent naval base on the site. The base has been in regular use since its establishment, and is a source of consistent tension ...[read more]
August 21, 2014
by Kimberly Bennett
Australian citizen David Hicks filed a motion to dismiss his conviction in the US Court of Military Commission Review on Wednesday after pleading guilty in 2007 to providing material support to terrorism. Hicks was captured in Afghanistan by northern alliance forces shortly after September 11, ...[read more]
June 29, 2014
by Elizabeth LaForgia
Ahmed Abu Khatallah made his first appearance on Saturday in the US District Court for the District of Columbia where he pleaded not guilty to a federal terrorism offense arising from his alleged participation in the September 2012 attack on a US facility in Benghazi, Libya. Khatallah was indicted ...[read more]

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