July 9, 2014
by Peter Snyder
The Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague issued a ruling Tuesday awarding Bangladesh more than 9,700 square miles in the Bay of Bengal, ending a maritime dispute with India that has spanned more than three decades. Bangladesh initiated the arbitral proceedings against India, pursuant to ...[read more]
March 6, 2014
by Theresa Donovan
The US Supreme Court ruled unanimously on Wednesday in Lozano v. Alvarez that under the Hague Convention, the one-year period for filing a petition for a child's abduction to another country is not subject to equitable tolling. The court stated that to invoke the remedy under the Hague Convention ...[read more]
December 11, 2013
by Jaclyn Belczyk
The US Supreme Court heard oral arguments Wednesday in two cases. In Lozano v. Montoya Alvarez the court will determine whether a district court considering a petition under the Hague Convention for the return of an abducted child may equitably toll the running of the one-year filing period when ...[read more]
September 5, 2013
by Sung Un Kim
The US Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Wednesday approved a joint resolution authorizing the limited use of force against Syria. In a 10-7 vote, the committee reasoned that Syria was in violation of international law, such as the UN Charter, the Geneva Conventions and the Protocol to the ...[read more]
May 23, 2013
by Kimberly Bennett
The Japanese parliament approved a bill on Wednesday adopting the Hague convention on resolving cross-border abductions of children. Parliament unanimously passed the treaty in response to international pressure for Tokyo to address concerns that Japanese mothers from broken international ...[read more]
May 20, 2011
by Julia Zebley
Japan announced Friday that they will be signing the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction at next week's G8 summit. Signatories of the Convention are required to return a child who has been "wrongfully removed" from his or her country of habitual residence, ...[read more]
November 8, 2010
by Ann Riley
The Hague Court of Appeals on Monday prohibited the eviction of squatters in Amsterdam, The Hauge, and Leeuwarden. In an oral ruling, the court relied on the European Convention on Human Rights, asserting that a person cannot be forced from a home without a prior affirmation from a judge that the ...[read more]
February 6, 2010
by JURIST Staff
On February 6, 1900, the Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA) was with the ratification of the 1899 Convention for the Pacific Settlement of International Disputes. Set at The Hague in the Netherlands, the PCA was the first international tribunal established to settle disputes between nations. The ...[read more]
February 1, 2010
by Andrea Bottorff
Ambassadors from eight countries met with Japanese Foreign Minister Katsuya Okada on Saturday to urge Japan to sign an international treaty that will help prevent parental child abductions across borders. Representatives from the US, Canada, the UK, Australia, France, New Zealand, Italy, and Spain ...[read more]
June 29, 2009
by Jaclyn Belczyk
The US Supreme Court on Monday granted certiorari in six cases. In Abbott v. Abbott, the Court will consider whether a ne exeat clause, which prohibits one parent from removing a child from the country without the other parent's consent, confers a right of custody within the meaning... ...[read more]

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