April 16, 2014
by Theresa Donovan
Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin on Monday signed into law a bill banning cities within the state from creating a mandatory minimum wage. The bill also prohibits cities from enacting various mandatory employee benefits, such as sick and vacation time. Supporters of the legislation believe that it ...[read more]
August 16, 2013
by G. Redd
The Michigan Court of Appeals ruled Thursday that Michigan's right-to-work law, applies to civil service employees. PA 349 makes it illegal for employers to require employees to pay union dues, and is viewed by its opponents as a legislative attack on organized labor. The AFL-CIO of Michigan, ...[read more]
March 14, 2013
by Theresa Donovan
JURIST Guest Columnist Karla Swift of the Michigan State AFL-CIO argues that the "right to work" laws enacted by the Michigan Legislature in 2012 are unconstitutional and were enacted in violation of Michigan's Open Meeting Act...The Michigan State AFL-CIO is currently pursuing two separate ...[read more]
February 12, 2013
by Dan Taglioli
The Michigan State AFL-CIO (MIAFLCIO), the Michigan Building and Construction Trades Council and other labor groups filed a lawsuit in the US District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan on Monday challenging the state's new "right-to-work" laws, which bar unions from forcing workers to pay ...[read more]
January 31, 2013
by Jerry Votava
The American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan (ALCUM) on Thursday filed a lawsuit against the state of Michigan challenging the state's "Freedom to Work" legislation. The ACLUM was joined by various labor unions, including the AFL-CIO. The suit claims that while the legislation was debated and ...[read more]
December 30, 2011
by Cody Harding
On December 30, 2005, the US DIstrict Court for the District of Columbia granted a request by John W. Hinckley, Jr., for seven overnight visits with his parents at their home in Williamsburg, Virginia. In 1981, Hinckley shot President Ronald Reagan and 3 others outside of the Hilton Hotel in ...[read more]
October 10, 2011
by Clay Flaherty
On October 10, 2007, the US District Court for the Northern District of California granted a preliminary injunction which blocked the implementation of Department of Homeland Security (DHS) regulations designed to make it more difficult for domestic employers to hire illegal immigrants. These ...[read more]
September 29, 2010
by Dwyer Arce
More than 500 international, US, state and local human rights and immigration advocacy organizations sent a letter to US President Barack Obama Wednesday expressing concern over the use of local law enforcement agencies in the enforcement of federal immigration law. The organizations, which ...[read more]
May 1, 2010
by JURIST Staff
On May 1, 1794, the Federal Society of Journeymen Cordwainers (shoemakers) was organized in Philadelphia to negotiate wages for its members, becoming the first trade union in the United States. Learn more about the history of the labor movement in the United States, and visit the website of the ...[read more]
May 1, 2010
by Andrew Morgan
On May 1, 1794, the Federal Society of Journeymen Cordwainers (shoemakers) was organized in Philadelphia to negotiate wages for its members, becoming the first trade union in the United States. Learn more about the history of the labor movement in the United States, and visit the website of ...[read more]

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